Musk Ox:

It loos cozy. The woolly coat that musk oxen boast is merely an outer layer. These huge beasts grow a second, insulating undercoat to cope with the fierce Arctic winter.

Musk Ox

Musk Ox

Hunting once threatened the musk ox’s survival but protection has enabled population growth and reintroduction to former ranges, including Alaska. Photographed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Snowy Owl:
The snowy owl breeds on the Arctic tundra. Just follows its favorite prey lemmings across the north. The snowy owl hunts both day and night.

Snowy Owl

Snowy Owl

Their plumage adapts to snow melt by turning browner. A warming Arctic may alter the prey available to these hunters.

Snow Leopard
These solitary cats are powerful predators that target big game such as bharal ibex. But a taste for livestock has cost many snow leopards their own lives.

Snow Leopard
Gentoo Penguin:

Gentoo Penguin

Gentoo Penguin

Gentoo penguins avoid the ice. They need protection from human disturbance. Pygoscelis Papua is most at home in the water. where it dives deep and long . It dives faster than any other bird.
Siberian Tiger:

Siberian Tiger

Siberian Tiger

The Siberian a conservation comeback story. Today, despite continued poaching. An apparently stable population has swelled to more than 500 animals.
Reindeer:
Reindeer are best known for their great migrations. Huge herds of Rangifer tarantulas head north each year.

Reideer

Reideer

Traveling hundreds of miles to feed on summer tundra plants. Reindeer have been semi domesticated for 2,000 years.

River Otter :

The North American river otter has ability to clean up America’s waters.

Sea_otter_pair

These playful members of the weasel family have reclaimed many of the river, bog, and lake habitats that pollution and other environmental degradation had driven them from a century ago.
Pacific Walrus:

Noaa-walrus

Noaa-walrus

Waning Arctic sea ice deprives walruses of platforms. They used for seafloor hunting, forcing them to haul out onto shore in unprecedented numbers and putting calves at mortal risk of stampede.
Black-Capped Chickadee:

black-capped-chickadee-winter

black-capped-chickadee-winter

The black-capped chickadee cheerfully shares its habitat with humans. These birds show so little fear of people that they can be coaxed to eat seeds from an outstretched hand.

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